Do you have our upcoming Google calendar session on your calendar?

This Thursday afternoon we’ll talk about this easy tool that can help you organize your time and share information with colleagues or students. Learn about basic and advanced calendar features, as well as appointment slots and invitations, that will: make your availability visible (or not) to others, help you streamline advising and other sign-ups, and keep everybody on the same page about time, location, and attendance for planned events. We’ll show you how to sync your calendar with your phone and to control automated reminders.

Plus a special bonus for productivity nerds: calendar integration with other apps such as Todoist and Wunderlist!

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Maximizing the Visibility of Your Research Workshop

Map of download locations from Digital Commons @ Conn College

Let us help you get your research to the broadest audience possible! Institutional repositories like Digital Commons work directly with Google and other search engines to maximize the visibility of your work. Putting your published research in Digital Commons is an easy, effective way to increase access to your work by making it available to a worldwide community of researchers who might not otherwise have access to expensive databases. Bring a CV to this workshop and library staff will help you determine which articles, conference presentations, and other research can be made openly available in Digital Commons.

Join us on Wednesday, October 25, 4:15-5:00 in the Davis Classroom (main floor, Shain Library).  Register (recommended but not required) by filling out the registration form or by emailing Jessica McCullough.

Debates in the Digital Humanities Reading Group, Fall 2017

 

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Should liberal arts campuses do digital humanities? What is the role of teaching and learning in digital humanities? How are the digital humanities impacting your field? How does DH engage with, improve, and/or perpetuate problems of social justice? Debates in the Digital Humanities addresses these questions and many more. In the reading group, we will read and discuss some essays together and others of your choosing, based on your own interests.

Attend one session or all three! Please let Lyndsay Bratton know if you are interested in attending any of the meetings, so that planned readings can be communicated.

Thursdays 2:30-3:30: September 21, October 26 & November 30
Advanced Technology Lab, Shain Library, Lower Level
Texts Available Online

See you at Camp Teach & Learn!

Will you be at Camp Teach & Learn next week? If so we look forward to seeing you at the following sessions!

Reflect, Integrate, Demonstrate: Student Digital Portfolio Pilots
Wednesday 24 May 2:30 PM to 4:00 PM

As we build a curriculum that asks students to reflect upon and integrate their coursework and co-curricular activities, several members of our teaching and learning community are experimenting with digital portfolios as a space for this work.  Through digital portfolios, students can archive artifacts that document and demonstrate their path through their education.  Narrative explanations and curated examples make it clear why they selected courses, a major or pathway, as well as what they learned and accomplished.  Faculty and staff who have used portfolios or participated in the pilot will share their experiences and sample student portfolios will be demonstrated.  We will end with a discussion and leave with ideas for future implementations.

Session leaders: Laura Little and Jessica McCullough; discussants include Amy Dooling, John Madura, Ariella Rotramel, and Sarah Queen.

Open Access & Digital Commons
Thursday 25 May 10:30 AM to 12:15

Did you know that most journals allow you to make previously published articles freely available over the internet?  Archiving your research in an institutional repository like Digital Commons makes it accessible to researchers who don’t have access to expensive databases and can make it more readily discoverable by those who do. Bring a c.v. or list of publications to this workshop and we will show you how to determine which articles can be made open access and how we can make your research as widely available as possible through Digital Commons.  We will also discuss some of the author features that make Digital Commons a practical, useful, and appealing platform for your research.

Developing Digital Humanities Projects:The Why and the How of Digital Scholarship
Thursday 25 May 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

Does digital humanities (DH) research have the same outcomes as traditional research? Does DH appear to require more effort to reach the same end goals? Why do digital humanities?

This session will focus on how digital scholarship projects can enhance student engagement and lend students useful new skillsets (both technical and critical), all while helping you achieve your pedagogical goals. Hear from faculty about why and how they integrated digital projects—mapping, online exhibitions, and computational analysis of data mined from digitized texts—into their humanities courses, what worked well, and what students gained from the experience.

Discussants include: Lyndsay Bratton, Karen Gonzalez Rice, Emily Morash, and Ariella Rotramel.

Filling in the Gaps Together: International Women’s Day Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon

Rose Olivera introducing the edit-a-thon

By Lyndsay Bratton, Rose Oliveira, Becky Parmer, and Ariella Rotramel

On Wednesday, March 8, we hosted the first annual International Women’s Day Wiki-Edit-A-Thon in Shain Library’s Advanced Technology Lab (ATL). International Women’s Day is observed throughout the world on March 8 and in some countries it is a public holiday. While celebrations in some countries include bringing women flowers or celebrating with a women’s night out, the day has a political history that resulted in this year’s call for a women’s strike in the United States.  International Women’s Day provides an important opportunity to reflect on ongoing gender inequality and the ability of women and allies to act to make change. Editing Wikipedia collectively provides one platform for responding to issues of gender inequality.

According to the 2011 Editor Survey, 91% of Wikipedians are men. Not only does such a homogenous editor force yield a body of work that reflects a limited scope of perspectives, but the survey also found that the relatively few women editors each make far fewer edits than men editors. Wikipedia Edit-a-Thons are staged periodically around the world, and often focus on reversing such trends by bringing women editors on board to fill in gaps in content related to women’s issues and women in history. A great example of one such initiative is the Art + Feminism Edit-a-Thon.

To address these issues of gender bias, we held an International Women’s Day Wikipedia-Edit-A-Thon. Edit-a-thons are events where newcomers and experienced Wikipedians alike come together to learn and participate in editing. Everyone was welcome and no prior editing experience was needed to participate. We had 13 people attend the evening’s event to create or improve articles on women and related topics.

Faculty, staff, students, and community members at the edit-a-thon

Rose Oliveira, Becky Parmer, and Ariella Rotramel started the event by talking about the the gender issues that face Wikipedia and how Ariella has used Wikipedia in her feminist theory class. Becky and Rose then reviewed the Five Pillars of Wikipedia to ensure that editors understood how to carry out their work effectively. Rose demonstrated how to create content on Wikipedia and the basics of editing. Andrew Lopez and Ashley Hanson shared a set of library resources they curated to help participants get started in their work. We also linked many resources on our Wikipedia libguide to assist editors in moving into editing.

Articles edited or created during the edit-a-thon

For the remainder of the time, we dove into the work. People chose to either collaborate in teams or work by themselves to research, create or improve a variety of articles. They contributed citations; rephrased poorly written sections; added new content to existing entries; and began work on developing new entries. All of these actions help improve Wikipedia by creating or strengthening content that relates to women and other underrepresented groups. In the last 10 minutes, everyone added their entries that they worked on a whiteboard: Lois Gibbs; Mary Foulke Morrisson; 16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence; Trans Day of Action; Caroline Black; Avtar Brah; Beatrice Cuming; and Marie Hoppe-Teinitzerová. We concluded the evening by taking turns sharing the woman, organization, or event that they worked on. It was rewarding to see what we were collectively able to do in a short amount of time.

As a result, on the third Wednesday of every month, we have decided to hold an informal Wiki Meetup or “Wiki Wednesday” at The Social at 5:15pm. We welcome new and experienced editors! To check in about the meetup, please contact Rose Oliveira (roliveir@conncoll.edu). For more information about working with Wikipedia in the classroom, please contact your instructional technologist or library liaison.

Tools in a Flash Next Week

7044719053_b7dcb4bb0eWe have two Tools in a Flash workshops scheduled next week. Tools in a Flash are short, hands-on workshops with the goal of building confidence and skill in one specific technology tool. All Tools in a Flash workshops are held in the Advanced Technology Lab, located on the lower level of Shain Library. Register or just stop by as your schedule allows.

Moodle Gradebook
Monday, March 6, 9:30-10:00 AM 

Get your Moodle gradebook in order! The Moodle gradebook is a great way to keep students informed about their progress in class, but it is important that it’s set up correctly so that there are no surprises at the end of the semester. This session will go over common gradebook setup scenarios and help you get your own gradebook ready to use for the semester.
Register

Scalar
Thursday, March 9, 9:30-10:00 AM

Looking for an alternative to WordPress for your digital projects? Come learn about Scalar, a free online platform built by the University of Southern California. Great for incorporating multimedia formats into your text, Scalar is easy to use and looks beautiful.
Register

Image: “Infinite Flash” flickr photo by JD Hancock https://flickr.com/photos/jdhancock/7044719053 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Register for February Workshops!

Join us for the following workshops! If you plan on attending, you can register by clicking on the workshop titles and filling out the form. Registration is not required, but it is helpful in knowing how much food and drink to order.

We ❤️ Google
February 14, 2017 at 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Neff Lab, Shain Library
Get the most out of G Suite (previously Google Apps for Education). In this session we will explore some of the lesser known but valuable tools in our suite of Google applications. Topics include citation tools in Docs, Forms, and Google Groups. Breakfast, coffee and Valentine’s Day treats will be provided! 

Tools in a Flash: RefWorks
Thursday, February 16, 9:00-9:30 AM
Advanced Technology Lab, Shain Library
RefWorks is a web-based bibliography and database manager that allows you to create a personal, searchable database of citations.  There is a new version of Refworks which adds increased functionality such as drag-and-drop uploading of pdfs, an enhanced PDF reader, and simultaneous group document editing.  Additionally, there is now a Google Docs add-in to complement the Word add-in for creating in-text citations, footnotes, endnotes and bibliographies.

Research Practices and Media Literacy in a ‘Post-Truth’ World
Tuesday, February 21, 9-10:15 a.m.
Haines Room, Shain Library
The national discussion surrounding “fake news” has thrust media literacy into the spotlight. At this workshop, we’ll consider the relevance of media literacy to student learning and research. Librarians will lead a discussion on how you can help students evaluate resources, provide information on media-related tools and resources, and present some results from the Research Practices Survey we undertook with incoming first-year students. We’ll also suggest and brainstorm assignments that are designed to help students evaluate and use the media sources. Breakfast will be provided.

Tools in a Flash: Omeka and Digital Collections
Tuesday, February 28, 9:30-10:00 AM
Advanced Technology Lab, Shain Library
Do you have scholarly digital collections but no way of managing or displaying them? Interested in having your students create and publish digital archives and collections, or to develop digital exhibitions for the public? Stop by and learn about Omeka, a free, easy-to-use, web-based platform for creating and managing digital collections and exhibitions. Omeka is as easy to set up as a blog, and provides a flexible, powerful suite of features to help foster user interaction and participation with your content.

Great Information Services Events Planned This Semester!

I am very excited to announce our line-up of workshops and special events this semester. We are widening our scope to include not just technology tools for teaching and productivity as in years past, but tools and resources that support both student and faculty research. This is a true collaborative effort and I hope that you can take advantage of some of our offerings this semester. And as always, I’d love to hear your ideas for new topics!

  •  Tools in a Flash: This is a new series of short (30-minute), narrowly focused workshops. The goals is for participants to get their hands dirty trying new tools. This semester’s topics include RefWorks, Omeka, Moodle Gradebook, and Scalar.
  • International Women’s Day Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Rebecca Parmer and Rose Olivera are organizing Shain Library’s first Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on March 8! A Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is a meetup where novice and experienced editors come together to improve Wikipedia entries. They will identify a selection of entries that need attention but welcome and encourage input on additional topics. As part of the event, they will cover the basics of editing in Wikipedia, and will have Wiki-ambassadors (experienced Wiki-editors) on hand to provide additional support.
  • Wondering what you can do about “fake news”? Concerned about the media literacy skills of your students? Join librarians for a discussion, learn helpful strategies and tools to improve literacy skills. Find out what our students know and where they struggle from data collected from an information literacy survey conducted with Connecticut College freshmen this past summer.
  • Amid all this excitement, don’t forget about our regular workshop series that includes discussion and hands-on components. This semester’s topics include G Suite, Open Access, and Digital Commons. Find the full list and register here!

Exciting Workshops Just Ahead! Wikipedia, Scalar, Tableau and More…

We are very excited for our next Teaching with Technology workshops and hope you can join us! We promise you will leave these workshops inspired and excited to try new tools in the classroom and in your own research. Also, don’t forget we are hosting the Data Fair this week in Shain Library!

Wikipedia Assignments for Developing Literacies
Wednesday, September 28, 1:00 – 2:00 PM
Haines Room, Shain Library lower level
In addition to adding much needed diversity and authority to Wikipedia, Wikipedia editing assignments teach students many important skills and requires them to think critically about information. Join us to discuss the value of Wikipedia editing and how to incorporate these assignments into your classes. Please bring your own computer for the hands-on portion.
Register

Digital Publishing and Visualization Platforms: Scalar and Tableau
Thursday, October 20, 3:00-4:00 PM
PC Classroom, Shain Library lower level
WordPress is not the only free publishing platform on the block for digital projects. Come learn about Scalar, a free online platform built by the University of Southern California. Great for incorporating multimedia formats into your text, Scalar is easy to use and looks beautiful. Tableau is a free platform for building interactive visualizations with your data. You can then embed your creations into WordPress and Scalar sites, or anywhere else you publish to the web.
Register

Data Fair September 26-29!

Connecticut College is a member of ICPSR (Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research), a data archive of more than 500,000 files of research in the social sciences. It hosts 16 specialized collections of data in education, aging, criminal justice, substance abuse, terrorism, and other fields. We have written about this amazing resource on the blog, in Andrew Lopez’s post The JSTOR of Data Archives.

We invite you and your students to join us for the ICPSR  Data Fair being held next week, which “aims to introduce, engage, and help the data community manage through the ongoing Data (R)Evolution.” We will be broadcasting Data Fair events in the Davis Lab all this week. You will find the schedule below, and on the ICPSR website.

ICPSR Data Fair Poster